Book Reviews and Highlights

Upright Women Wanted

Sarah Gailey

  • Action & Adventure
  • Dystopian
  • Fiction
  • LGBTQ+
  • Science Fiction
  • As Esther breathed in the sweet, musty smell of the horse blankets in the back of the Librarians’ wagon, she chewed on the I- told- you- so feeling that had overwhelmed her ever since her father had told her the news about Beatriz.
  • Chapter 1 | Page: 9
  • #first-sentence
  • The Head Librarian’s badge glittered in the early-morning sun. It was a hammered copper star with three columns etched into it—one for virtue, one for knowledge, and one for patriotism.
  • Chapter 1 | Page: 10
  • #librarian #📖
  • “Ever since I was a little girl, I dreamed of joining an Honorable Brigade of Morally Upright Women, doing Rewarding Work Supporting a Bright Future for—” “— the Nation’s Children,” Bet finished flatly. “You memorized the posters.”
  • Chapter 1 | Page: 15
  • “Helping to further the spread of correct education is so important. If it weren’t for the Librarians, no one would have up- to- date Approved Materials to read and watch and listen to.
  • Chapter 1 | Page: 16
  • Cye was small and wide- hipped, with rough- hewn features, a crooked nose that looked ready for a fight, and large brown eyes that looked startled no matter what they were pointed at.
  • Chapter 2 | Page: 24
  • “I’m they on the road and she in town. You can take time getting used to they on the road, but if you forget about she when we’re in town, you’ll have to learn how to think around a bullet.”
  • Chapter 2 | Page: 27
  • It’s not safe to be they in town, no more than it’s safe for Bet and Leda to be anything but Librarians who happen to ride together. When there’s people around who we don’t trust, we let them think we’re the kinds of people who are allowed to exist. And the only kind of Librarian that’s allowed to exist is one who answers to she.
  • Chapter 2 | Page: 28
  • The Approved Materials were considered educational and entertaining, honest and inspiring. These were the materials that shaped the nation. They made sure that everyone had the same information, the same stories and the same songs to share, the same videos to watch. They united the entire country, reinforcing the values of the citizens.
  • Chapter 2 | Page: 37
  • These were people who were happy with themselves. They liked themselves, not in spite of who they were but because of who they were. It didn’t make sense, not hardly.
  • Chapter 3 | Page: 54
  • Esther thought hard about that one. The things the Librarians brought weren’t subject to the Textbook Approval and Research Council, since they only worked on schoolbooks, and they weren’t subject to the Media Review Committee, since they mostly did film and television. “The Board of Materials Approval?” she guessed.
  • Chapter 5 | Page: 90
  • “You’ve got to stop waiting to be told you’re allowed to do things,” Amity said. She didn’t look at her, kept loping along as casual as a fed coyote. “You’ve got to promise me you’ll stop being too scared to piss without permission.”
  • Chapter 5 | Page: 92
  • “Oh, sure,” she said, using the warm, quiet voice she’d always relied on to keep men happy. It was a tone that said she wasn’t a threat, wasn’t going to laugh at them, was maybe a little impressed by them for a reason she wouldn’t reveal.
  • Chapter 7 | Page: 104
  • She had seen a man decide that she deserved to die, and she had killed him for it.
  • Chapter 10 | Page: 148
  • The Librarians would make sure of it.
  • Chapter 12 | Page: 173
  • #last-sentence
  • I owe this book to all of them, and I owe it to every queer person out there who thinks they don’t have a future, who thinks there’s no place for them in this world, who thinks that all is lost if they can’t find a way to bury the person who they are: This is for you. This is for all of you. There’s a place for you in the future, and it’s better than you can possibly imagine. Please be there to meet it. We need you on our side.
  • Acknowledgments | Page: 176