Book Reviews and Highlights

Ramona the Brave

Beverly Cleary

  • Children's Fiction
  • Fiction
  • Juvenile Fiction
  • And she had been proud of herself because she thought she was being brave. Now it turned out that she was not brave. She was silly and embarrassing. Ramona’s confidence in herself was badly shaken.
  • 1. Trouble in the Park | Page: 19
  • Agreeing with Beezus—Beatrice—gave Ramona a cozy feeling, as if something unusually pleasant had taken place.
  • 1. Trouble in the Park | Page: 22
  • Ramona felt secure and happy. Agreeing was so pleasant she wished she and her sister could agree more often.
  • 1. Trouble in the Park | Page: 22
  • The two sisters exchanged a look of complete understanding. They both knew this was the sort of advice easy for adults to give but difficult for children to follow.
  • 1. Trouble in the Park | Page: 23
  • Nobody understood what it was like to be six years old and the littlest one in the family unless you counted old Picky-picky, and even he was ten years old.
  • 1. Trouble in the Park | Page: 25
  • Ramona had heard a lot of uninteresting grown-up talk about borrowing money from a bank to pay for it, but nothing had ever come of it. All she understood was that her father worked at something that sounded boring in an office downtown, and there was never quite enough money in the Quimby family. They were certainly not poor, but her parents worried a lot about taxes and college educations.
  • 2. Mrs. Quimby’s Secret | Page: 39
  • “Yes,” said their mother. “I am going to work from nine in the morning till two in the afternoon in Dr. Perry’s office.
  • 2. Mrs. Quimby’s Secret | Page: 40
  • “Oh, Mother!” Beezus was all enthusiasm. Dr. Perry was the woman who had given the girls their checkups and their shots ever since they were born. “Just think! You’re going to be liberated!”
  • 2. Mrs. Quimby’s Secret | Page: 40
  • Mrs. Kemp and Mrs. Quimby sat in the kitchen drinking coffee and discussing their children while Beezus and Ramona defended their possessions from Willa Jean. This was what grown-ups called playing with Willa Jean.
  • 3. The Hole in the House | Page: 53
  • Next she explored her reader to see if she could find the grown-up words she knew: gas, motel, burger. She could not.
  • 4. The First Day of School | Page: 64
  • “We are not in kindergarten any longer. We are in the first grade, and people in the first grade must learn to be good workers.”
  • 5. Owl Trouble | Page: 77
  • Ramona scowled, and the girl scowled back. Ramona managed a small smile. So did the girl. Ramona felt better. She wanted the girl in the mirror to like her.
  • 5. Owl Trouble | Page: 96
  • No need to sign the note. Her mother would know who it was from, because Beezus wrote cursive. Ramona left her note on the table beside the front door, where the family always looked for mail and messages.
  • 6. Parents’ Night | Page: 107
  • “Yes, Ramona. I had no idea you were old enough to leave a note.” Mrs. Quimby’s words gave Ramona a good feeling. Her mother knew the right answers to questions.
  • 6. Parents’ Night | Page: 108
  • Beezus called out from her room. “What did you talk about at the Kemps’?”“Your mother’s new job,” answered Mr. Quimby. “Oh,” said Beezus. “What else?”“The high cost of living. Football. Things like that,” said Mr. Quimby. “No family secrets.”
  • 6. Parents’ Night | Page: 109
  • You are the lucky one. You can think up your own ideas because you have imagination.
  • 6. Parents’ Night | Page: 112
  • She went to work coloring her turtle green, her mouse brown. Filling in outlines was not very interesting, but it was soothing.
  • 8. Ramona Says a Bad Word | Page: 145
  • She cried harder than she ever had cried in her life. She cried until she was limp and exhausted. Then Ramona felt her mother’s hand on her back. “Ramona,” she said gently, “what are we going to do with you?” With red eyes, a swollen face, and a streaming nose, Ramona sat up and glared at her mother. “Love me!” Her voice was fierce with hurt. Shocked at her own words, she buried her face in the pillow. She had no tears left.
  • 8. Ramona Says a Bad Word | Page: 153
  • At the same time she wondered how she could find out what frankincense and myrrh were without letting anyone know of her ignorance.
  • 8. Ramona Says a Bad Word | Page: 156
  • You do need to learn self-control and to keep your hands to yourself. There are all kinds of teachers in the world just as there are all kinds of other people, and you must learn to get along with them.
  • 8. Ramona Says a Bad Word | Page: 159
  • Ramona had not felt so happy since she was in Miss Binney’s kindergarten. Too bad Beezus had first dibs on Mr. Cardoza. Ramona might have married him herself someday if she ever decided to get married.
  • 9. Mr. Quimby’s Spunky Gal | Page: 183
  • Mrs. Griggs approved of her! Ramona smiled with relief and pretended to limp to her seat as her teacher closed the door. She no longer had to dread turkeys—or her teacher.
  • 9. Mr. Quimby’s Spunky Gal | Page: 186
  • Brave Ramona, that’s what they would think, just about the bravest girl in the first grade. And they would be right. This time Ramona was sure.
  • 9. Mr. Quimby’s Spunky Gal | Page: 190