Book Reviews and Highlights

Ender's Game

Orson Scott Card

  • Action & Adventure
  • Fiction
  • Military
  • Science Fiction
  • Space Opera
  • The novelet “Ender’s Game” was my first published science fiction. It was based on an idea— the battleroom— that came to me when I was sixteen years old. I had just read Isaac Asimov’s Foundation trilogy, which was (more or less) an extrapolation of the ideas in Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, applied to a galaxy- wide empire in some far future time.
  • Introduction | Page: 30
  • #isaac-asimov #asimov #gibbon #roman-empire #sci-fi #science-fiction
  • And then, as so many science fiction readers have done over the years, I felt a strong desire to write stories that would do for others what Asimov’s story had done for me.
  • Introduction | Page: 41
  • #isaac-asimov #asimov #sci-fi #science-fiction
  • In other genres, that desire is usually expressed by producing thinly veiled rewrites of the great work: Tolkien’s disciples far too often simply rewrite Tolkien, for example.
  • Introduction | Page: 42
  • #tolkien
  • In science fiction, however, the whole point is that the ideas are fresh and startling and intriguing; you imitate the great ones, not by rewriting their stories, but rather by creating stories that are just as startling and new.
  • Introduction | Page: 44
  • #sci-fi #science-fiction
  • I had no gift for mathematics and no great love for it, either. Though I relished the study of logic and languages, and virtually inhaled histories and biographies, it never occurred to me at the time that these were just as valid sources of science fiction stories as astronomy or quantum mechanics.
  • Introduction | Page: 48
  • #sci-fi #science-fiction
  • Far more deeply rooted in my mind was my experience, five or six years earlier, of reading Bruce Catton’s three- volume Army of the Potomac. I remembered so well the stories of the commanders in that war— the struggle to find a Union general capable of using McClellan’s magnificent army to defeat Lee and Jackson and Stuart, and then, finally, Grant, who brought death to far too many of his soldiers, but also made their deaths mean something, by grinding away at Lee, keeping him from dancing and maneuvering out of reach.
  • Introduction | Page: 57
  • #military-history
  • I learned that history is shaped by the use of power, and that different people, leading the same army, with, therefore, approximately the same power, applied it so differently that the army seemed to change from a pack of noble fools at Fredericksburg to panicked cowards melting away at Chancellorsville, then to the grimly determined, stubborn soldiers who held the ridges at Gettysburg, and then, finally, to the disciplined, professional army that ground Lee to dust in Grant’s long campaign. It wasn’t the soldiers who changed. It was the leader.
  • Introduction | Page: 63
  • #history #military-history
  • The essence of training is to allow error without consequence. Three- dimensional warfare would need to be practiced in an enclosed space, so mistakes wouldn’t send trainees flying off to Jupiter. It would need to offer a way to practice shooting without risk of injury; and yet trainees who were “hit” would need to be disabled, at least temporarily.
  • Introduction | Page: 74
  • #warfare #space-warfare
  • It occurred to me then for the first time that the idea of the story is nothing compared to the importance of knowing how to find a character and a story to tell around that idea.
  • Introduction | Page: 84
  • #storytelling
  • I learned to separate the story from the writing, probably the most important thing that any storyteller has to learn— that there are a thousand right ways to tell a story, and ten million wrong ones, and you’re a lot more likely to find one of the latter than the former your first time through the tale.
  • Introduction | Page: 101
  • #storytelling #writing
  • Maybe it was because of the children in the car on the way up that I decided that the trainees in the battleroom were so young. Maybe it was because I, barely an adolescent myself, understood only childhood well enough to write about it. Or maybe it was because of something that impressed me in Catton’s Army of the Potomac: that the soldiers were all so young and innocent. That they shot and bayoneted the enemy, and then slipped across the neutral ground between armies to trade tobacco, jokes, liquor, and food.
  • Introduction | Page: 122
  • #military #soldiers
  • Even though it was a deadly game, and the suffering and fear were terrible and real, it was still a game played by children, not all that different from the wargames my brothers and I had played, firing water- filled squirt bottles at each other.
  • Introduction | Page: 126
  • #military #child-soldiers
  • I have a master’s degree in literature, and in writing Ender’s Game I deliberately avoided all the little literary games and gimmicks that make “fine” writing so impenetrable to the general audience.
  • Introduction | Page: 141
  • #literature #literary
  • I designed Ender’s Game to be as clear and accessible as any story of mine could possibly be. My goal was that the reader wouldn’t have to be trained in literature or even in science fiction to receive the tale in its simplest, purest form.
  • Introduction | Page: 144
  • #literature #sci-fi #science-fiction
  • And, since a great many writers and critics have based their entire careers on the premise that anything that the general public can understand without mediation is worthless drivel, it is not surprising that they found my little novel to be despicable.
  • Introduction | Page: 146
  • #literature #literary
  • In fact, I realized in retrospect that this may indeed be part of the reason why it was so important to me, there on the lawn in front of the Salt Palace, to write a story in which gifted children are trained to fight in adult wars.
  • Introduction | Page: 159
  • #child-soldiers
  • Because never in my entire childhood did I feel like a child. I felt like a person all along— the same person that I am today. I never felt that I spoke childishly. I never felt that my emotions and desires were somehow less real than adult emotions and desires. And in writing Ender’s Game, I forced the audience to experience the lives of these children from that perspective— the perspective in which their feelings and decisions are just as real and important as any adult’s.
  • Introduction | Page: 161
  • #children-pov
  • But the truer answer is that Ender’s Game asserts the personhood of children, and those who are used to thinking of children in another way— especially those whose whole career is based on that— are going to find Ender’s Game a very unpleasant place to live. Children are a perpetual, self- renewing underclass, helpless to escape from the decisions of adults until they become adults themselves. And Ender’s Game, seen in that context, might even be a sort of revolutionary tract.
  • Introduction | Page: 166
  • #children-pov
  • All our lives we’ve unconsciously been living by the philosophy, “The only way to gain respect is doing so well you can’t be ignored.” And, for me and Mike, at least, “beating the system” at school is how we’ve chosen to do this.
  • Introduction | Page: 178
  • #respect
  • To them, Ender’s Game was an epic tale, a story that expressed who they are as a community, a story that distinguished them from the other people around them. They didn’t love Ender, or pity Ender (a frequent adult response); they were Ender, all of them. Ender’s experience was not foreign or strange to them; in their minds, Ender’s life echoed their own lives. The truth of the story was not truth in general, but their truth.
  • Introduction | Page: 193
  • #children-pov
  • Why else do we read fiction, anyway? Not to be impressed by somebody’s dazzling language— or at least I hope that’s not our reason. I think that most of us, anyway, read these stories that we know are not “true” because we’re hungry for another kind of truth: The mythic truth about human nature in general, the particular truth about those life- communities that define our own identity, and the most specific truth of all: our own self- story.
  • Introduction | Page: 230
  • #fiction #literature
  • Fiction, because it is not about somebody who actually lived in the real world, always has the possibility of being about ourselves.
  • Introduction | Page: 234
  • #fiction #literature #real-world
  • Ender’s Game is a story about gifted children. It is also a story about soldiers.
  • Introduction | Page: 235
  • #children-pov #child-soldiers #military
  • This is the essence of the transaction between storyteller and audience. The “true” story is not the one that exists in my mind; it is certainly not the written words on the bound paper that you hold in your hands.
  • Introduction | Page: 244
  • #storytelling
  • The story itself, the true story, is the one that the audience members create in their minds, guided and shaped by my text, but then transformed, elucidated, expanded, edited, and clarified by their own experiences, their own desires, their own hopes and fears.
  • Introduction | Page: 247
  • #storytelling
  • The story of Ender’s Game is not this book, though it has that title emblazoned on it. The story is the one that you and I will construct together in your memory.
  • Introduction | Page: 249
  • #storytelling
  • “I’ve watched through his eyes, I’ve listened through his ears, and I tell you he’s the one. Or at least as close as we’re going to get.”
  • 1. Third | Page: 1
  • #first-sentence #ender-adults
  • For a moment, the others backed away and Stilson lay motionless. They were all wondering if he was dead. Ender, however, was trying to figure out a way to forestall vengeance. To keep them from taking him in a pack tomorrow. I have to win this now, and for all time, or I’ll fight it every day and it will get worse and worse.
  • 1. Third | Page: 5
  • #strategy
  • Ender knew the unspoken rules of manly warfare, even though he was only six. It was forbidden to strike the opponent who lay helpless on the ground; only an animal would do that.
  • 1. Third | Page: 5
  • #strategy #war
  • Ender leaned his head against the wall of the corridor and cried until the bus came. I am just like Peter. Take my monitor away, and I am just like Peter.
  • 1. Third | Page: 6
  • #ender-peter
  • “I went back through some of the tapes. I can’t help it. I like the kid. I think we’re going to screw him up.” “Of course we are. It’s our job. We’re the wicked witch. We promise gingerbread, but we eat the little bastards alive.”
  • 2. Peter | Page: 7
  • #ender-adults
  • Ender did not see Peter as the beautiful ten- year- old boy that grown- ups saw, with dark, thick, tousled hair and a face that could have belonged to Alexander the Great.
  • 2. Peter | Page: 8
  • #male-desc #boy-desc #peter-desc
  • Peter opened his bottom drawer and took out the bugger mask. Mother had got upset at him when Peter bought it, but Dad pointed out that the war wouldn’t go away just because you hid bugger masks and wouldn’t let your kids play with make- believe laser guns.
  • 2. Peter | Page: 8
  • #war
  • He put on the mask. It closed him in like a hand pressed tight against his face. But this isn’t how it feels to be a bugger, thought Ender. They don’t wear this face like a mask, it is their face. On their home worlds, do the buggers put on human masks, and play? And what do they call us? Slimies, because we’re so soft and oily compared to them?
  • 2. Peter | Page: 8
  • #buggers-empathy
  • You want to be elected. And they won’t elect you if your opponents can dig up the fact that your brother and sister both died in suspicious accidents when they were little.
  • 2. Peter | Page: 10
  • #peter-desc
  • There was no getting to him. Peter was a murderer at heart, and nobody knew it but Valentine and Ender.
  • 2. Peter | Page: 11
  • #peter-desc
  • … until Ender wanted to scream at him, I know I’m a Third, I know it, if you want I’ll go away so you don’t have to be embarrassed in front of everybody, I’m sorry I lost the monitor and now you have three kids and no obvious explanation, so inconvenient for you, I’m sorry sorry sorry.
  • 2. Peter | Page: 11
  • #ender-parents
  • He whispered, “Ender, I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I know how it feels, I’m sorry, I’m your brother, I love you.” A long time later, Peter’s even breathing said that he was asleep. Ender peeled the bandaid from his neck. And for the second time that day he cried.
  • 2. Peter | Page: 11
  • #ender-peter
  • “Knocking him down won the first fight. I wanted to win all the next ones, too. So they’d leave me alone.”
  • 3. Graff | Page: 14
  • #ender-strategy
  • Ender couldn’t help it, he was too afraid, too ashamed of his own acts; though he tried not to, he cried again. Ender did not like to cry and rarely did; now, in less than a day, he had done it three times. And each time was worse. To cry in front of his mother and father and this military man, that was shameful.
  • 3. Graff | Page: 14
  • #ender-adults
  • Ender didn’t like fighting. He didn’t like Peter’s kind, the strong against the weak, and he didn’t like his own kind either, the smart against the stupid.
  • 3. Graff | Page: 15
  • #ender
  • Only the first two children had a free education. Taxes steadily rose with each new child. Your father turned sixteen and invoked the Noncomplying Families Act to separate himself from his family. He changed his name, renounced his religion, and vowed never to have more than the allotted two children.
  • 3. Graff | Page: 16
  • #family #govt-family
  • They look at you and see you as a badge of pride, because they were able to circumvent the law and have a Third. But you’re also a badge of cowardice, because they dare not go further and practice the noncompliance they still feel is right.
  • 3. Graff | Page: 17
  • #family #govt-family #ender-adults
  • “We monitored your brother and sister, Ender. You’d be amazed at how sensitive the instruments are. We were connected directly to your brain. We heard all that you heard, whether you were listening carefully or not. Whether you understood or not. We understand.”
  • 3. Graff | Page: 17
  • #ender-adults
  • “Not anything you do, Ender. Your life itself. Your brother hates you because you are living proof that he wasn’t good enough. Your parents resent you because of all the past they are trying to evade.”
  • 3. Graff | Page: 17
  • #ender-adults
  • “Hard work. Studies, just like school here, except we put you into mathematics and computers much more heavily. Military history. Strategy and tactics. And above all, the battleroom.”
  • 3. Graff | Page: 17
  • #battleroom #strategy
  • “War games. All the boys are organized into armies. Day after day, in zero gravity, there are mock battles. Nobody gets hurt, but winning and losing matter. Everybody starts as a common soldier, taking orders. Older boys are your officers, and it’s their duty to train you and command you in battle.
  • 3. Graff | Page: 17
  • #battleroom #strategy
  • “With Ender, we have to strike a delicate balance. Isolate him enough that he remains creative— otherwise he’ll adopt the system here and we’ll lose him. At the same time, we need to make sure he keeps a strong ability to lead.”
  • 4. Launch | Page: 20
  • #ender-adults
  • Wherever their laughter came from, Ender couldn’t find such a place in himself. He was afraid, and fear made him serious.
  • 4. Launch | Page: 21
  • #fear
  • Will Valentine see me disappear into the shuttle? He thought of waving at her, of running to the cameraman and saying, “Can I tell Valentine good- bye?” He didn’t know that it would be censored out of the tape if he did, for the boys soaring out to Battle School were all supposed to be heroes.
  • 4. Launch | Page: 21
  • #ender-family
  • Later, though, he would remember that it was even before he left Earth that he first thought of it as a planet, like any other, not particularly his own.
  • 4. Launch | Page: 22
  • #earth
  • Then it became clear. Graff had deliberately caused it. It was worse than the abuse in the shows. When the sergeant picked on you, the others liked you better. But when the officer prefers you, the others hate you.
  • 4. Launch | Page: 24
  • #social-politics #social-dynamics
  • Ender felt sick. He had only meant to catch the boy’s arm. No. No, he had meant to hurt him, and had pulled with all his strength. He hadn’t meant it to be so public, but the boy was feeling exactly the pain Ender had meant him to feel.
  • 4. Launch | Page: 24
  • #fighting
  • “You made them hate me.” “So? What will you do about it? Crawl into a corner? Start kissing their little backsides so they’ll love you again? There’s only one thing that will make them stop hating you. And that’s being so good at what you do that they can’t ignore you. I told them you were the best. Now you damn well better be.”
  • 4. Launch | Page: 25
  • #social-politics #social-dynamics #ender-adults
  • It isn’t the world at stake, Ender. Just us. Just humankind. As far as the rest of the biosphere is concerned, we could be wiped out and it would adjust, it would get on with the next step in evolution. But humanity doesn’t want to die. As a species, we have evolved to survive. And the way we do it is by straining and straining and, at last, every few generations, giving birth to genius. The one who invents the wheel. And light. And flight. The one who builds a city, a nation, an empire.
  • 4. Launch | Page: 26
  • #humanity #genius
  • “Individual human beings are all tools, that the others use to help us all survive.”
  • 4. Launch | Page: 26
  • #humanity
  • “Anderson, think what we’re going to do to him.” Anderson was defiant. “We’re going to make him the best military commander in history.” “And then put the fate of the world on his shoulders. For his sake, I hope it isn’t him. I do.”
  • 4. Launch | Page: 26
  • #ender-adults
  • “I told you. His isolation can’t be broken. He can never come to believe that anybody will ever help him out, ever. If he once thinks there’s an easy way out, he’s wrecked.” “You’re right. That would be terrible, if he believed he had a friend.” “He can have friends. It’s parents he can’t have.”
  • 5. Games | Page: 29
  • #ender-adults
  • The other boys were talking about things— the big scoreboard on one wall, the food, the bigger kids. Ender could only watch in isolation.
  • 5. Games | Page: 31
  • #social-politics #social-dynamics
  • “Hi,” he said. “Hi,” Ender said. “I’m Mick.” “Ender.” “That’s a name?” “Since I was little. It’s what my sister called me.” “Not a bad name here. Ender. Finisher. Hey.” “Hope so.”
  • 5. Games | Page: 31
  • #ender #name-origin
  • “What about you?” asked Ender. “Me? I’m nothing. I’m a fart in the air conditioning. I’m always there, but most of the time nobody knows it.” Ender smiled tentatively.
  • 5. Games | Page: 32
  • #funny
  • Start over again. All the doubling he could hold. The pain was gone. The tears were gone. He would not cry.
  • 5. Games | Page: 33
  • #ender
  • Dap came to the door that night and moved quietly among the beds, touching a hand here, a forehead there. Where he went there was more crying, not less. The touch of kindness in this frightening place was enough to push some over the edge into tears. Not Ender, though.
  • 5. Games | Page: 33
  • #compassion
  • When Dap came, his crying was over, and his face was dry. It was the lying face he presented to Mother and Father, when Peter had been cruel to him and he dared not let it show. Thank you for this, Peter. For dry eyes and silent weeping. You taught me how to hide anything I felt. More than ever, I need that now.
  • 5. Games | Page: 33
  • #ender-peter
  • Many things to learn. Ender worked as hard as anyone; all of them struggled for the first time in their lives, as for the first time in their lives they competed with classmates who were at least as bright as they.
  • 5. Games | Page: 33
  • #ender
  • “A new flock of dwarfs just came aboard,” said another boy. “But it talks. Did you know they could talk?” “I see,” said Ender. “You’re afraid to play me two out of three.” “Beating you,” said the boy, “would be as easy as pissing in the shower.”
  • 5. Games | Page: 34
  • #funny
  • His name, Ender quickly learned, was Bernard. He spoke his own name with a French accent, since the French, with their arrogant Separatism, insisted that the teaching of Standard not begin until the age of four, when the French language patterns were already set. His accent made him exotic and interesting; his broken arm made him a martyr; his sadism made him a natural focus for all those who loved pain in others.
  • 5. Games | Page: 35
  • #french
  • After all, Ender wasn’t his only target. Bernard was setting up a kingdom, wasn’t he?
  • 5. Games | Page: 36
  • #social-dynamics #social-politics
  • Ender watched from the fringes of the group as Bernard established the hierarchy. Some of the boys were useful to him, and he flattered them outrageously. Some of the boys were willing servants, doing whatever he wanted even though he treated them with contempt.
  • 5. Games | Page: 36
  • #social-dynamics #social-politics
  • “Yesterday someone sent a message that was signed GOD,” Bernard said. “Really?” said Dap. “I didn’t know he was signed onto the system.” Dap turned and left, and the room filled with laughter.
  • 5. Games | Page: 38
  • #funny
  • They laughed together, and two other Launchies joined them. Ender’s isolation was over. The war was just beginning.
  • 5. Games | Page: 39
  • #social-dynamics #friendship
  • He hadn’t meant to kill the Giant. This was supposed to be a game. Not a choice between his own grisly death and an even worse murder. I’m a murderer, even when I play. Peter would be proud of me.
  • 6. The Giant’s Drink | Page: 47
  • #ender-peter #murder
  • “Does it ever seem to you that these boys aren’t children? I look at what they do, the way they talk, and they don’t seem like little kids.” “They’re the most brilliant children in the world, each in his own way.” “But shouldn’t they still act like children? They aren’t normal. They act like— history. Napoleon and Wellington. Caesar and Brutus.” “We’re trying to save the world, not heal the wounded heart. You’re too compassionate.”
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 48
  • #child-soldiers
  • Alai suddenly kissed Ender on the cheek and whispered in his ear, “Salaam.”
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 50
  • #friendship
  • Perhaps it’s called the end of the world because it’s the end of the games, because I can go to one of the villages and become one of the little boys working and playing there, with nothing to kill and nothing to kill me, just living there.
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 54
  • #humanity #children
  • As he thought of it, though, he could not imagine what “just living” might actually be. He had never done it in his life. But he wanted to do it anyway.
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 54
  • #humanity #life
  • Ender despaired. He already had nothing going for him— grossly undertrained, small, inexperienced, doomed to be resented for early advancement.
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 55
  • #social-dynamics #social-politics
  • For a moment, as Ender looked around at the laughing, jeering faces, he imagined their bodies covered with hair, their teeth pointed for tearing. Am I the only human being in this place? Are all the others animals, waiting only to devour?
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 55
  • #social-dynamics #social-politics
  • A boy stood there, tall and slender, with beautiful black eyes and slender lips that hinted at refinement.
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 55
  • #male-desc #boy-desc
  • I know how to bring a group together, too, thought Ender. Maybe I’ll be commander someday.
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 58
  • #leadership #military
  • Manipulation of gravity was one thing; deception by the officers was another; but the most important message was this: the adults are the enemy, not the other armies. They do not tell us the truth.
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 59
  • #ender-adults
  • He could see Bonzo’s anger growing hot. Hot anger was bad. Ender’s anger was cold, and he could use it. Bonzo’s was hot, and so it used him.
  • 7. Salamander | Page: 62
  • #anger
  • And it came down to this: In the moment when I truly understand my enemy, understand him well enough to defeat him, then in that very moment I also love him.
  • 13. Valentine | Page: 168
  • #compassion
  • “We train our commanders the way we do because that’s what it takes— they have to think in certain ways, they can’t be distracted by a lot of things, so we isolate them. You. Keep you separate. And it works. But it’s so easy, when you never meet people, when you never know the Earth itself, when you live with metal walls keeping out the cold of space, it’s easy to forget why Earth is worth saving. Why the world of people might be worth the price you pay.”
  • 13. Valentine | Page: 171
  • #social-isolation
  • “Oh, no, of course not. I.F. Command is on the minor planet Eros, which should be about three months away from here at the highest possible speed. Which is the speed you’ll use, of course.”
  • 13. Valentine | Page: 173
  • #eros
  • “I am your enemy, the first one you’ve ever had who was smarter than you. There is no teacher but the enemy. No one but the enemy will tell you what the enemy is going to do. No one but the enemy will ever teach you how to destroy and conquer. Only the enemy shows you where you are weak. Only the enemy tells you where he is strong. And the rules of the game are what you can do to him and what you can stop him from doing to you. I am your enemy from now on. From now on I am your teacher.”
  • 14. Ender’s Teacher | Page: 184
  • #mentorship #teacher #enemy
  • Real. Not a game. Ender’s mind was too tired to cope with it all. They weren’t just points of light in the air, they were real ships that he had fought with and real ships he had destroyed. And a real world that he had blasted into oblivion. He walked through the crowd, dodging their congratulations, ignoring their hands, their words, their rejoicing. When he got to his own room he stripped off his clothes, climbed into bed, and slept.
  • 14. Ender’s Teacher | Page: 208
  • #spoiler
  • Ender grabbed Mazer’s uniform and hung onto it, pulling him down so they were face to face. “I didn’t want to kill them all. I didn’t want to kill anybody! I’m not a killer! You didn’t want me, you bastards, you wanted Peter, but you made me do it, you tricked me into it!” He was crying. He was out of control.
  • 14. Ender’s Teacher | Page: 208
  • #murder #spoiler #child-soldiers #ender-adults
  • “Of course we tricked you into it. That’s the whole point,” said Graff. “It had to be a trick or you couldn’t have done it. It’s the bind we were in. We had to have a commander with so much empathy that he would think like the buggers, understand them and anticipate them. So much compassion that he could win the love of his underlings and work with them like a perfect machine, as perfect as the buggers. But somebody with that much compassion could never be the killer we needed. Could never go into battle willing to win at all costs. If you knew, you couldn’t do it. If you were the kind of person who would do it even if you knew, you could never have understood the buggers well enough.”
  • 14. Ender’s Teacher | Page: 208
  • #spoiler #child-soldiers #ender-adults
  • “And it had to be a child, Ender,” said Mazer. “You were faster than me. Better than me. I was too old and cautious. Any decent person who knows what warfare is can never go into battle with a whole heart. But you didn’t know. We made sure you didn’t know. You were reckless and brilliant and young. It’s what you were born for.”
  • 14. Ender’s Teacher | Page: 208
  • #child-soldiers #spoiler #ender-adults
  • “You had to be a weapon, Ender. Like a gun, like the Little Doctor, functioning perfectly but not knowing what you were aimed at. We aimed you. We’re responsible. If there was something wrong, we did it.”
  • 14. Ender’s Teacher | Page: 209
  • #child-soldiers #spoiler #ender-adults
  • And always the dream ended with a mirror or a pool of water or the metal surface of a ship, something that would reflect his face back to him. At first it was always Peter’s face, with blood and a snake’s tail coming from the mouth. After a while, though, it began to be his own face, old and sad, with eyes that grieved for a billion, billion murders— but they were his own eyes, and he was content to wear them.
  • 14. Ender’s Teacher | Page: 210
  • #ender-peter
  • I said I did what I believed was necessary for the preservation of the human race, and it worked; we got the judges to agree that the prosecution had to prove beyond doubt that Ender would have won the war without the training we gave him.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 213
  • #humanity #warfare
  • “All the more dangerous because he could so easily be controlled. In all the world, the name of Ender is one to conjure with. The child- god, the miracle worker, with life and death in his hands. Every petty tyrant- to- be would like to have the boy, to set him in front of an army and watch the world either flock to join or cower in fear. If Ender came to Earth, he’d want to come here, to rest, to salvage what he can of his childhood. But they’d never let him rest.”
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 214
  • #warfare
  • At first Ender believed that they would bring him back to Earth as soon as things quieted down. But things were quiet now, had been quiet for a year, and it was plain to him now that they would not bring him back at all, that he was much more useful as a name and a story than he would ever be as an inconvenient flesh- and- blood person.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 215
  • #influence
  • For a time, the only work in Eros was cleaning up after the bloody League War and receiving the reports of the starships, once warships, that were now exploring the bugger colony worlds. But now Eros was busier than ever, more crowded than it had ever been during the war, as colonists were brought here to prepare for their voyages to the empty bugger worlds.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 216
  • #eros
  • Ender, Earth belongs to Peter. And if you don’t go with me now, he’ll have you there, and use you up until you wish you’d never been born.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 218
  • #ender-peter
  • “Val,” he said. “I just want one thing clear. I’m not going for you. I’m not going in order to be governor, or because I’m bored here. I’m going because I know the buggers better than any other living soul, and maybe if I go there I can understand them better. I stole their future from them; I can only begin to repay by seeing what I can learn from their past.”
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 219
  • #humanity #new-world
  • They were governed by a council now, and administrators were elected, so that Ender, though they still called him governor, was in fact only a judge. There were crimes and quarrels, alongside kindness and cooperation; there were people who loved each other and people who did not; it was a human world.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 220
  • #humanity #new-world
  • The only name they knew was that of Peter Wiggin, the Hegemon of Earth; the only news that came was news of peace, of prosperity, of great ships leaving the littoral of Earth’s solar system, passing the comet shield and filling up the bugger worlds.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 220
  • #ender-peter
  • Soon there would be other colonies on this world, Ender’s World; soon there would be neighbors; already they were halfway here; but no one cared. They would help the newcomers when they came, teach them what they had learned, but what mattered in life now was who would marry whom, and who was sick, and when was planting time, and why should I pay him when the calf died three weeks after I got it.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 220
  • #enders-world
  • We are like you; the thought pressed into his mind. We did not mean to murder, and when we understood, we never came again. We thought we were the only thinking beings in the universe, until we met you, but never did we dream that thought could arise from the lonely animals who cannot dream each other’s dreams. How were we to know? We could live with you in peace. Believe us, believe us, believe us.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 224
  • #compassion #new-world
  • He reached into the cavity and took out the cocoon. It was astonishingly light, to hold all the hope and future of a great race within it.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 224
  • #compassion #new-world
  • “I’ll carry you,” said Ender, “I’ll go from world to world until I find a time and a place where you can come awake in safety. And I’ll tell your story to my people, so that perhaps in time they can forgive you, too. The way that you’ve forgiven me.”
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 224
  • #compassion #new-world
  • If only we could have talked to you, the hive- queen said in Ender’s words. But since it could not be, we ask only this: that you remember us, not as enemies, but as tragic sisters, changed into a foul shape by fate or God or evolution. If we had kissed, it would have been the miracle to make us human in each other’s eyes. Instead we killed each other. But still we welcome you now as guestfriends.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 225
  • #compassion #new-world
  • Come into our home, daughters of Earth; dwell in our tunnels, harvest our fields; what we cannot do, you are now our hands to do for us. Blossom, trees; ripen, fields; be warm for them, suns; be fertile for them, planets: they are our adopted daughters, and they have come home.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 225
  • #compassion #new-world
  • And always Ender carried with him a dry white cocoon, looking for the world where the hive- queen could awaken and thrive in peace.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 226
  • #compassion #new-world
  • He looked a long time.
  • 15. Speaker for the Dead | Page: 226
  • #last-sentence